The Meatrix II: Revolting

The Meatrix II: Revolting This Thursday, The Meatrix II: Revolting the sequel of the animated movie Meatrix will premiere online.

From the press release:

The long-awaited sequel to the Internet’s most popular advocacy film, The Meatrix II: Revolting, will premiere online this Thursday (3/30). The launch will be preceded by the world premiere screening at New York City’s Bowery Poetry Club on March 29 at 6 p.m. EST.

The sequel to the Webby-award winning Flash animation, The Meatrix, will expose the ugly truths behind industrial dairy farming.

Learn more about up-and-coming farm heroes Moopheus, Leo and Chickity and their crusade to unveil the real dangers in factory dairy farming at www.Meatrix2.com.

Live Webcast of the Solar Eclipse

From Physorg.com:

On March 29, just prior to a rare, four-minute total eclipse of the sun, three University of California, Berkeley, astronomers will take the stage in a 1,900-year-old Roman amphitheater in Turkey to introduce local students and the public to the science and lore of solar eclipses.

For the benefit of eclipse watchers elsewhere in the world, the 1:55 p.m. Turkish time eclipse will be Webcast live, thanks to the support of San Francisco’s Exploratorium and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This program is part of the yearly “Sun-Earth Day” celebration sponsored by NASA’s Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum.

Read it all.

You can watch the solar eclipse here or here.

Vegetarian Fast Food

According to an article I read today, McDonalds introduced new vegan options, including the McAloo Tikki, Crispy Chinese Sandwich, Salsa Wrap, and a vegan pizza pocket called the McPuff in India.

You can reach to the article from here.

I agree with the writer, and I wish they offered the similar options in the US.

(via 360 Eats.com)

Food Industry a Target in Obesity Fight

J.M. HIRSCH, an Associated Press writer, wrote an interesting article about the obesity problem in the US, and the current lawsuits against the food industry.

It’s tempting to blame big food companies for America’s big obesity problem. After all, they’re the folks who Supersized our fries, family-portioned our potato chips and Big Gulped our sodas. There’s also the billions they’ve spent keeping their products ever on our minds and in our mouths.

Likened by some to the way tobacco companies seduced smokers, such practices have made the food industry the target of lawsuits and legislation seeking to yank junk food from schools and curb advertising to children.

But some experts say neither the problem nor the solution is nearly so simple.

Read it all.

Some Statistics

Here are some statistics about food born illnesses at several countries.

Average Number of cases of foodborne illnesses in the United States: 76 million (or 26 people in every 100)
Average Number of cases of foodborne illnesses in Canada: 2 million (or 6 people out of every 100)
Average number of foodborne illnesses in France: 750,000 cases (or 1.2 out of every 100 people)

(via Accidental Hedonist)